Study protocol: ICONS: Identifying continence options after stroke: A randomised trial

Thomas, LH, Watkins, CL, French, B, Sutton, CJ, Forshaw, D, Cheater, F, Roe, Brenda, Leathley, M, Burton, C, McColl, E and Booth, J (2011) Study protocol: ICONS: Identifying continence options after stroke: A randomised trial. BMC Trials, 12. p. 131. DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-12-131

Item not available from this archive.

Abstract

Background Urinary incontinence following acute stroke is common, affecting between 40%-60% of people in hospital after a stroke. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for urinary incontinence and urinary incontinence after stroke, national audit data suggest incontinence is often poorly managed. Conservative interventions (e.g. bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training and prompted voiding) have been shown to have some effect with participants in Cochrane systematic reviews, but have not had their effectiveness demonstrated with stroke patients. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled pilot trial designed to assess the feasibility of a full-scale cluster randomised trial and to provide preliminary evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a systematic voiding programme for the management of continence after stroke. Stroke services will be randomised to receive the systematic voiding programme, the systematic voiding programme plus supported implementation, or usual care. The trial aims to recruit at least 780 participants in 12 stroke services (4 per arm). The primary outcome is presence/absence of incontinence at six weeks post-stroke. Secondary outcomes include frequency and severity of incontinence, quality of life and cost-utility. Outcomes will be measured at six weeks, three months and (for participants recruited in the first three months) twelve months after stroke. Process data will include rates of recruitment and retention and fidelity of intervention delivery. An integrated qualitative evaluation will be conducted in order to describe implementation and assist in explaining the potential mediators and modifiers of the process.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: Nursing and Midwifery
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2018 14:39
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/10077

Archive staff only

Item control page Item control page