Mythologies and Panics: Twentieth Century Constructions of Child Prostitution

Brown, A. (2004) Mythologies and Panics: Twentieth Century Constructions of Child Prostitution. Children & Society, 18 (5). pp. 344-354. ISSN 0951-0605 DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/CHI.808

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Abstract

This paper examines twentieth century social constructions of child prostitutes and child prostitution, the origins of these representations and the extent to which they have been used as metaphors for other perceived social, economic and political problems. It is important to recognise that these children have been sexually abused and that discourses that have portrayed them as either assertive and blameworthy seducers or as abducted and coerced innocents are constructed myths which detracted from recognition of the actual problems these children have faced.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BJ Ethics
D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: History
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2010 14:52
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/1374

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