Barriers to dying at home: the impact of poor co-ordination of community service provision for patients with cancer

O'Brien, Mary and Jack, Barbara (2010) Barriers to dying at home: the impact of poor co-ordination of community service provision for patients with cancer. Health and Social Care in the Community, 18 (4). pp. 337-345. ISSN 0966-0410 DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2009.00897.x

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Abstract

For patients dying of cancer, there is an emphasis on giving choice regarding preferred location for care, with the option of dying at home, which is integral to UK government health initiatives such as the End of Life Care Programme. However, patients continue to be admitted to hospital in the terminal phase of their illness when they have expressed a desire to die at home. A qualitative study, using two audio taperecorded focus group interviews, with a purposive sample of district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses (19) was undertaken across two primary care trusts in the north west of England. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. From a service provision perspective, the results reveal that poor discharge planning and co-ordination, difficulty in establishing additional equipment and services together with inadequate out of hours medical provision were all factors contributing to hospital admissions for patients with cancer in the last hours and days of life, and thus were barriers to dying at home.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: Nursing and Midwifery
Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2012 14:46
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/4017

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