Daily hypoxia increases basal monocyte HSP72 expression in healthy human subjects

Taylor, L, Midgley, A W, Chrismas, B, Hilman, A R, Madden, L A, Vince, R V and McNaughton, Lars R (2011) Daily hypoxia increases basal monocyte HSP72 expression in healthy human subjects. Amino Acids, 40 (2). pp. 393-401. ISSN 0939-4451 DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00726-010-0644-x

Item not available from this archive. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) performs vital roles within the body at rest and during periods of stress. In vitro, research demonstrates HSP72 induction in response to hypoxia. Recently, in vivo, an acute hypoxic exposure (75 min at 2,980 m) was sufficient to induce significant increases in monocyte expressed HSP72 (mHSP72) and a marker of oxidative stress in healthy human subjects. The purpose of the current study was to identify the impact of 10 consecutive days of hypoxic exposures (75 min at 2,980 m) on mHSP72 and erythropoietin (EPO) expression, markers of oxidative stress, and maximal oxygen consumption in graded incremental aerobic exercise. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily normobaric hypoxic exposures for 75 min at 2,980 m for 10 consecutive days, commencing and ceasing at 0930 and 1045, respectively. This stressor was sufficient to induce significant increases in mHSP72, which was significantly elevated from day 2 of the hypoxic exposures until 48 h post-final exposure. Notably, this increase had an initial rapid (30% day on day compared to baseline) and final slow phase (16% day on day compared to baseline) of expression. The authors postulate that 7-day hypoxic exposure in this manner would be sufficient to induce near maximum hypoxia-mediated basal mHSP72 expression. Elevated levels of mHSP72 are associated with acquired thermotolerance and provide cross tolerance to non-related stressors in vivo, the protocol used here may provide a useful tool for elevating mHSP72 in vivo. Aside from these major findings, significant transient daily elevations were seen in a marker of oxidative stress, alongside sustained increases in EPO expression. However, no physiologically significant changes were seen in maximal oxygen consumption or time to exhaustion.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sports Science
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2012 15:08
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/4028

Archive staff only

Item control page Item control page