Clustered cardiometabolic risk, cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity in 10-11 year old children. The CHANGE! Project baseline.’ Archives of Exercise in Health and Disease

Gobbi, R., Davies, I.G., Fairclough, Stuart J., Mackintosh, K.A., Warburton, G.L., Stratton, G., George, K.P., Hackett, A.F. and Boddy, L.M. (2012) Clustered cardiometabolic risk, cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity in 10-11 year old children. The CHANGE! Project baseline.’ Archives of Exercise in Health and Disease. Archives of Exercise in Health and Disease, 3 (3). pp. 207-213. ISSN 1647-1652

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Abstract

Objective: The primary objective of this cross sectional pilot study was to report clustered risk scores combining traditional invasive with non invasive cardiometabolic risk markers in 10-11 year old children participating in the CHANGE! project at baseline. A secondary objective was to determine the relationship between clustered risk score and objectively measured physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). Design: Habitual PA was measured using accelerometry and CRF (VO2peak) was assessed using an individually calibrated treadmill based protocol. Twenty-nine participants had valid data for all components of the clustered risk score, calculated using total cholesterol: high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (TC:HDL-C), glucose, systolic blood pressure (BP), LV Mass Index (g/m2.7), and trunk fat mass (g). Participants with a clustered risk score greater than 1SD above the mean were categorised as ‘higher’ risk (n=6); all others were categorised as ‘normal’ risk. Results: Clustered risk score, controlling for somatic maturity and gender, was negatively correlated with vigorous intensity physical activity (VPA) (r= -0.51, p=0.01), moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) (r= -0.44, p=0.03) and VO2peak (r= -0.57, p<0.01). ANCOVA, with somatic maturity and gender as covariates, revealed that those in the ‘normal’ risk group were more fit than those in the ‘higher’ risk group [f (1,24)=4.518, p=0.044]. There were no statistically significant differences between risk groups and PA; however, mean data suggest that those in the ‘normal’ risk group accrued 4 minutes more daily VPA than the ‘higher’ risk group which may be clinically important. Conclusion: This provides further evidence of the importance of promoting CRF and VPA in children, to reduce cardiometabolic risk especially for those that are ‘higher’ risk.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Sports Science
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2015 15:54
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/6519

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