“Wild Surmise”: The Pleasures and Pains of Coming Second in Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons

McInnes, Andrew (2016) “Wild Surmise”: The Pleasures and Pains of Coming Second in Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons. Children's Literature Association Quarterly, 41 (3). pp. 281-294. ISSN 1553-1201 DOI https://doi.org/10.1353/chq.2016.0034

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Abstract

This article explores Arthur Ransome's engagement with ideas about children, adventure and exploration from the long eighteenth century in his celebrated Swallows and Amazons series. I argue that Ransome positions his child protagonists between the practical enlightenment of Daniel Defoe's marooned hero and John Keats' Romantic belatedness: the Walkers and Blacketts find themselves exploring a world that is already inhabited by those they dismissively call “natives” - their adult parents. Swallows and Amazons uses Crusoe and Keats to work out ways for children to cope with coming second - with their subordination within existing discourses.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PR English literature
Divisions: English Language & Literature
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2016 14:02
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/7835

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