Transforming Children's Peer Relationships: Studies on the Effectiveness of Short-term Interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving

Erwin, P. (2004) Transforming Children's Peer Relationships: Studies on the Effectiveness of Short-term Interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving. Annual Conference, British Psychological Society, London.

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the extent to which a short-term interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving (ICPS) interventions could successfully change children’s social problem solving abilities, the group dynamics affecting these changes, and the effect of these changes on children’s social behaviour and social status. Design: Four studies will be discussed: a metaanalytic review followed by three intervention studies using a common pre-test/ post-test design and comparing an experimental group with a no-treatment control. Methods: Each intervention study used a single primary school class of seven- to eight-year-old children. Pre-test/post-test assessments of ICPS abilities used a standard set of vignettes. In Studies 1 and 2, a sociometric test was also administered; in Study 3, children were additionally reassessed after a follow-up period of four weeks and behavioural observations were made outside of the training groups. Training groups consisted of four to six children and met for eight sessions of approximately 20 minutes each, over a period of four weeks. Behaviour within training groups was video-recorded in Study 4. Analysis: For the cognitive skills, pre-test/post test (or follow-up) difference scores were calculated. Behavioural observations were content analysed. Subsequent analyses were by means of univariate and bivariate statistical procedures. Conclusions: The overall pattern of results showed ICPS training was an effective means a improving children’s social problem solving abilities. Although the evidence for improvements in sociometric status was weak, significant improvements in social behaviour with peers were found. Improvements were found to be related to patterns of involvement within the intervention groups.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Psychology
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2010 11:27
URI: http://repository.edgehill.ac.uk/id/eprint/969

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